VA resumes overpayment notifications, medical copayment collections while continuing to offer Veterans expansive debt relief options

Date:

The Department of Veterans Affairs will resume over-payment notifications for new benefit debts and the debts deferred from April 6, 2020 through Sept. 30, 2021 due to the COVID pandemic.

VA suspended debt collection April 6, 2020 and will restart debt collection Oct. 1, 2021, however, VA will not deduct debts from benefits payments until January 2022.

Collections on medical co-payments created prior to April 6, 2020 and on new medical co-payments will also resume Oct. 1, 2021.

Debt notification letters sent to affected Veterans and beneficiaries will include options to request debt relief for those who continue to need financial relief from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The department will continue to provide relief options such as extending repayment plans, waivers and temporary hardship suspensions during these challenging times. It has been and will remain a priority of the department to work individually with each Veteran.

Veterans and beneficiaries with questions or requiring assistance on debt management can access the following resources:

·       For benefit debt information, review frequently asked questions, submit requests online or call 1-800-827-0648.

·       For medical care and pharmacy services copayment debt, contact the Health Resource Center at 1-866-400-1238.

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